Choice and obligation

If it’s an obligation, then you don’t have a choice.

Pretending you do is simply a way to create frustration. Free yourself to simply do what you have to do.

On the other hand, if you do have a choice (and you probably do) then it doesn’t make sense to treat it as an obligation. Own the choice.

       


The first piece of tape

I’m sitting on a black couch in the lobby of a nice theater. The couch is cracked and peeling, with seven strips of black gaffer’s tape holding it together. And you don’t have to be an interior geologist to see that it has developed this patina over time, bit by bit.

The question is: Who was the first person who decided to fix the couch with tape?

The third or fifth person did a natural thing–here’s a ratty couch, let’s keep it the best we can.

But the first taper?

The first taper decided that it was okay for this theater to have a taped couch. The first taper didn’t make the effort to alert the authorities, to insist on getting the couch repaired properly.

The first taper decided, “this is good enough for now.”

This is how we find ourselves on the road to decay.


 

Here’s a new video the team just put together for the altMBA. I hope it resonates with you…

PS The early decision deadline for the altMBA is March 1st.

       


You Can Lead a Horse to Insights…

Image courtesy of Pixabay

Is your customer experience transformation work stuck at good intentions? 

One of the biggest showstoppers in customer experience transformations today is execution – actually, it’s the lack thereof. You’ve got a ton of data, insights, and intentions, but action is the key – and it’s not happening. Customers can feel it.

No brainer, you say? Not so fast. If it was a no brainer, would I call it one of the biggest showstoppers today? I think not. You know it’s a problem!


Have You Digitized Your Journey Map?

Image courtesy of Pixabay

Do you know why it’s important to digitize your journey maps?

In the past, I’ve written about some of the myths of journey mapping. One of those myths was:

Without a digital mapping platform, I can’t even begin to map.


Advanced SEO: Digital Summit Slide Deck

Advanced SEO cuts through abstraction. It doesn’t add layers of fixes and workarounds to mask SEO problems. Instead, it removes the problems themselves.

This deck is my talk from Digital Summit 2019. There are a lot of slides. If you’ve seen me speak you’re used to that. If not, don’t let it scare you. Every slide has a single link, idea, or tip. It’s a fast read that I’ve hopefully crammed with useful stuff.

The post Advanced SEO: Digital Summit Slide Deck appeared first on Portent.


Lessons for telling time

For something as dominant as the four digits that we use to tell time, it’s disappointing that there’s no manual, and not surprising that we do it wrong so often.

I’m not talking about the big hand/little hand part of announcing what time it is. I’m focused on how we use our awareness of time to screw up our narrative about life.

Here are some examples:

We focus on the days, making short-term decisions, instead of being cognizant of the years. We ignore the benefits that short-term pain can have in earning us long-term satisfaction. Which means that we often fail to invest, embracing a shortcut instead.

We rehearse the past, obsessing about sunk costs, instead of freeing ourselves up to make new decisions based on new information.

We put a stopwatch on our best experiences, ticktocking the moments instead of living in them.

But we fail to be honest about the time when we’re in a dip, or unhappy, imagining instead that it is lasting forever.

We confuse the thrill of fast-paced media with the magic of doing work that matters, even though they each take just as long.

We might have a fancy watch, but that doesn’t mean we’re good at telling time.

       


Moderating a Panel: Top 10 Ways to Facilitate a Fascinating Discussion

At most conferences, the panel discussions are terribly boring. In fact, some panels are so dreadful that many attendees use the time to network in the hallways or check emails. But it doesn’t have to be that way! I’ve moderated dozens of panels and witnessed hundreds. Here are my top ten ways to make the next panel you moderate the highlight of the event.


Five reasons you might want to start a podcast

  1. You’ll meet some amazing people. Most podcasts are based on interviews, and having a podcast is a fabulous excuse to interview fascinating people.
  2. It will help clarify your thinking. You might hesitate to write, but most people don’t hesitate to speak their thoughts. Spending twenty minutes or more to explain something is a great way to understand it.
  3. You will earn credibility. Our culture gives extra credit to people who are thoughtful, generous and well-spoken.
  4. It’s a productive habit that gets both easier and more useful as you stick with it.
  5. It creates an asset, one that people can engage with for years to come.
  6. (not a reason) To make a fortune. You won’t. But 1 through 5 are a bargain, because you don’t need a permit, a license or a budget. You can simply begin.

Today’s the best day to sign up to join Alex DiPalma and me in the Podcast Fellowship.

We’ve run it twice before, and it works better than anyone expected. We’re assembling a cohort of terrific people all on the same journey–to share their ideas and make a ruckus.

Alex is a significant force in the world of podcasting, with experience at NPR and Midroll, and you couldn’t ask for a more insightful and committed guide. She and I have worked together on the Akimbo podcast for more than a year.

Lessons start this week, so today’s the day. It’s easy to sign up.

Podcasting is a way to find your voice and we’d love to have you join us.

       


Experience and variation

The only way to learn from experience is to have different experiences.

The very nature of an experiment is that there’s a chance you’re doing it wrong, or at least less ‘right’ than the way you usually do it. Which leads to the trap of no new experiences.

The only alternative is to eagerly engage with the possible.

If you follow the recipe the same way every time, you’ll get the same results every time.

       


Fish in a barrel

There’s some confusion here.

Of course it’s easy to shoot fish in a barrel.

The difficult part, the part no one talks about, is getting the fish into the barrel in the first place.